The Unemployment Experience

Actually, I’m technically not unemployed anymore; a temporary job still counts as employment. I had one last note on the whole experience that I wanted to share. We talked about the obsolescence of the alarm clock. That principal extends in a much more general manner. It seems that in the unemployed world, clocks and calendars exert considerable less influence. Boundaries of time melt away and the hours are nothing to you. You fill them up, or, more accurately, you don’t, without regard to which hours they are. It could be one a.m. or one p.m. It’s all the same in the unemployed world. In all of this…freedom, you practically forget about things like commuter traffic and other phenomena that are the effects of time constraints. Yes, all of the features of that other life are now remnants. That blank canvas is bound to collect some less than charming moments.

Empty StreetI was leaving somewhere at a ridiculous hour of the morning, because, you know, I didn’t have an alarm clock to answer to or a schedule of events to attend to. And I drove the desolate streets of downtown. They were so quiet, so still. It was the first time in a long time that I actually took notice of how still they were, all empty. And, of course, the moment spawned a poem:

The Morning After

The empty streets whisper stories
of the kind that only find
life
under the orange glow
of street lamps
Eventually the serene
morning graces
these empty streets
as they tell the
tale that he wishes was not so
he hopes there are
holes
in his mind
excavated so in a
moment of recall he can
simply fall
into ignorance
The yellow and white lines
run alongside his car
as he makes his escape
their knowing charm plied to
revive a night already
dead
Behind the steering wheel
staring down the lane
there he prays
“Just let me pass this
morning after
left alone.”

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3 Comments

  1. I can completely relate to this post, as someone who has had the “jobless” title for a long time during rough times. Hours would just come and go, and all sense of time would just blur together. It was really, really bad.

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